Walking with the Gruppo dei Dodici—-April 20-24

Ancient Roman Port near Scauri

We have walked through beautiful scenery from hills to the seaside, and had some wonderful cultural experiences, but almost no time for sleeping or writing.

So what follows is a too short summary of recent days on the Via Francigena of the South.

Donna and Ned presented a Kei and Molly textile from Albuquerque to a helpful nun

It is hard to sort out the days. As so much has been crammed into them. Following the moving procession on Good Friday evening in Sessa, we had a jolly, simple meal of pizza together, then a long walk in the dark, past barking dogs and under a full moon to our lovely lodgings at the Convent of Santa Caterina di Volpicelli.

We have been treated as celebrities, greeted by mayors, treated to an extravagant lunch at a daycare center, and accompanied into Terracina by musicians playing ancient pilgrim music on réplicas of antique instruments. We’ve also been given talks on an important early suspension bridge, the largest and best-preserved Roman cistern dating from the time of Julius Caesar, and an ancient fort in Terracina.

We’ve had fabulous meals and walked through sites important in both ancient and modern history. There is too much to see, and too little time as we make our way through southern Italy on our pilgrimage to Rome.

Three bridges
Cistern in Formis
Our leader Giuseppe Pucci with musicians in Terracina
Walking toward the Fossanova Abbey on April 24
Antipasto tonight

Today, April 24, we have reached our halfway-point.

Author: Linnea Hendrickson

I am a retired librarian who walked my first camino to Santiago de Compostela in 2010, all alone from Le Puy-en-Velay to Finisterre. I've since returned to Spain, France, Portugal, or Italy at least every other year and continued to walk the many ways to Santiago.

3 thoughts on “Walking with the Gruppo dei Dodici—-April 20-24”

  1. Are pilgrims always treated as celebrities on this Camino or is it the time of year – Easter?
    I thought I wanted to walk Geneva-LePuys next, but this Camino calls. I haven’t been to Rome since I was 21.
    And does this group often walk this stretch?
    Thanks, Linnea.

    Like

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